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Camel gelatin composition, properties, production, and applications

Jaswir, Irwandi and Al-Kahtani, Hassan Abdullah M. and Octavianti, Fitri and Lestari, Widya and Yusof, Nurlina (2020) Camel gelatin composition, properties, production, and applications. In: Health and environmental benefits of camel products. IGI Global, Hershey PA, USA, pp. 306-327. ISBN 9781799816041

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Abstract

Gelatin is an important protein produced through partial hydrolysis of collagen from animal parts and byproducts such as cartilage, bones, tendons, and hides. The ability of gelatin to form a thermo-reversible gel at normal body temperature and high water content make it an exceptional food ingredient. A good quality gelatin is translucent, brittle, colorless (sometimes slightly yellow), bland in taste, and odorless. Gelatin has been found useful as stabilizer and filler in dairy products and other food industries. Recently, the global gelatin production net over 300,000 metric tons: 46% were from pigskin, 29.4% from bovine hides, 23.1% from bones, and 1.5% from other parts. Although camels have been recognized as source of meat and milk, utilization of camel bones and skins for gelatin production has not been fully explored. This chapter will discuss the processing of camel gelatin extraction.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Additional Information: 5784/77749
Uncontrolled Keywords: Camel Gelatin Composition, Properties, Production, and Applications
Subjects: R Medicine > RK Dentistry
Kulliyyahs/Centres/Divisions/Institutes (Can select more than one option. Press CONTROL button): Kulliyyah of Dentistry
International Institute for Halal Research and Training (INHART)
Kulliyyah of Dentistry > Oral Maxxilofacial Surgery & Oral Diagnosis
Depositing User: Dr Irwandi Jaswir
Date Deposited: 30 Jun 2020 12:36
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2020 12:36
URI: http://irep.iium.edu.my/id/eprint/77749

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