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Lives versus livelihoods? Perceived economic risk has a stronger association with support for COVID-19 preventive measures than perceived health risk

Nisa, Claudia F and Belanger, Jocelyn J and Faller, Daiane G and Buttrick, Nicholas R and Mierau, Jochen O and Austin, Maura M. K. and Schumpe, Birga M. and Sasin, Edyta M. and Agostini, Maximilian and Gutzkow, Ben and Kreienkamp, Jannis and Abakoumkin, Georgios and Abdul Khaiyom, Jamilah Hanum and Ahmedi, Vjollca and Akkas, Handan and Almenara, Carlos A and Atta, Mohsin and Bagci, Sabahat Cigdem and Basel, Sima and Kida, Edona Berisha and Bernado, Allan B. I. and Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit and Choi, Hoon-Seok and Cristea, Mioara and Csaba, Sara and Damnjanović, Kaja and Danyliuk, Ivan and Dash, Arobindu and Di Santo, Daniela and Douglas, Karen M and Enea, Violeta and Fitzsimons, Gavan J and Gheorghiu, Alexandra and Gómez, Ángel and Grzymala‑Moszczynska, Joanna and Hamaidia, Ali and Han, Qing and Helmy, Mai and Hudiyana, Joevarian and Jeronimus, Bertus F and Jiang, Ding-Yu and Jovanović, Veljko and Kamenov, Zeljka and Kende, Anna and Keng, Shian-Ling and Tra, Thi Thanh Kieu and Koc, Yasin and Kovyazina, Kamila and Kozytska, Inna and Krause, Joshua and Kruglanski, Arie W and Kurapov, Anton and Kutlaca, Maja and Lantos, Nóra Anna and Lemay Jr., Edward P (2021) Lives versus livelihoods? Perceived economic risk has a stronger association with support for COVID-19 preventive measures than perceived health risk. Scientific Reports, 11 (1). ISSN 2045-2322

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Abstract

This paper examines whether compliance with COVID‑19 mitigation measures is motivated by wanting to save lives or save the economy (or both), and which implications this carries to fight the pandemic. National representative samples were collected from 24 countries (N = 25,435). The main predictors were (1) perceived risk to contract coronavirus, (2) perceived risk to suffer economic losses due to coronavirus, and (3) their interaction effect. Individual and country‑level variables were added as covariates in multilevel regression models. We examined compliance with various preventive health behaviors and support for strict containment policies. Results show that perceived economic risk consistently predicted mitigation behavior and policy support—and its effects were positive. Perceived health risk had mixed effects. Only two significant interactions between health and economic risk were identified—both positive.

Item Type: Article (Journal)
Additional Information: 5374/90090
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF309 Consciousness. Cognition
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF608 Will. Volition. Choice. Control
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HB Economic Theory
H Social Sciences > HB Economic Theory > HB71 Economics as a science
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology > HM1001 Social psychology
Kulliyyahs/Centres/Divisions/Institutes (Can select more than one option. Press CONTROL button): Kulliyyah of Islamic Revealed Knowledge and Human Sciences
Kulliyyah of Islamic Revealed Knowledge and Human Sciences > Department of Psychology
Depositing User: Dr Jamilah Hanum Abdul Khaiyom
Date Deposited: 10 Jun 2021 18:51
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2021 18:51
URI: http://irep.iium.edu.my/id/eprint/90090

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